BBETTERDAILY: R.A.K.

(CNN) — A hitchhiking feline in Florida has a 50-year-old truck owner to thank for her unusual rescue.

Errand Frazier of Vero Beach wasn’t quite sure what to do at first when he heard purring coming from his Chevy pickup, parked outside his house in late May. He couldn’t see anything and wasn’t sure exactly where it was, or even what type of animal was in there. So, he left an open can of cat food under one of the tires and set up a camera to try to get to the bottom of it.

When he came back the next morning, the food was gone, but there was nothing on the video, he said.

Thinking he had lost his mind, he went on an impromptu fishing trip to clear his head. When he got to the canal, the purring started again.

Errand Frazier shows where he cut open his pickup truck to rescue a kitten.
Errand Frazier shows where he cut open his pickup truck to rescue a kitten.

Taking matters into his own hands, he reached for his toolbox, took out some sheet metal cutters and cut back the metal on the side of the truck bed. As he peeled it back, he spotted a kitten.

“I seen this little rascal peeking at me,” Frazier recalled. “I said, ‘What in the world? You hitched a ride!’”

Frazier hadn’t thought anything of slicing into his truck. He and his wife, Cindy, have a dog and two cats, and care deeply about animals. In the past, Frazier said, he has rescued stray kittens and brought them to the local Humane Society.

Frazier could see that the cat was under the bed of his truck, lodged in the frame, and he couldn’t get to it. Unsure what to do, he sought advice from the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County. Driving slowly, avoiding any bumps in the road, he reached the society’s animal shelter and approached a staff member.

“I said, ‘Ma’am, there’s a kitten that hitchhiked from my home and I can’t get it,”" Frazier said. “She said, ‘Man, you did a job on your truck.’”

It was a team rescue. Humane Society staff member Tonya Martinez got under Frazier’s truck to try to move the kitten forward, while staff member Maria Valencia adorned gloves to catch the kitty and animal care supervisor Robyn Krajewski stood ready with a special carrier, said Janet Winikoff, director of education at the local Humane Society, who posted the story on CNN iReport.

The shelter, which estimates the kitten was about 8 weeks old, named her Megan.

A week after the rescue, the shelter invited Frazier for a reunion. The kitten purred in his arms. He took it as a sign.

“It was almost telling me, ‘Thank you for saving my life,’” he said.

The cat has since been adopted by a family with two teenage girls, adoption counselor Sue Kelly said.

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After Winikoff shared the story of the rescue on the shelter’s Facebook page this week, several people offered to help pay for the cost to repair Frazier’s vehicle.

Frazier’s wife, Cindy, said they were touched by the outpouring of support. The truck is their only vehicle. She said it didn’t cross their mind to look into repairing it because she knew they couldn’t afford it. Both have disabilities; Errand Frazier has macular degeneration, but still has the ability to drive during the day.

“We really never expected all of this, to be honest, but God does blessings every day,” Cindy Frazier said. “That’s the reason that little kitten just showed up here — because God knew we would do whatever we needed to do to make sure that kitten was safe.”

Minnesota Food Truck Doesn’t Sell Meals, But Accepts Them

A Minnesota food truck is filling local hearts with joy without striking up a single burner.

That’s because Finnegans Reverse Food Truck doesn’t actually serve meals. But it will gladly accept them.

The giant green mobile is a charity drive on wheels, collecting non-perishables and monetary donations for those in need.

Launched this spring by Finnegans beer in partnership with the Emergency Foodshelf Network’s Harvest for the Hungry Program, the Reverse Food Truck has already resulted in close to 5,700 pounds of produce being delivered to hungry individuals. Finnegans’ goal is to raise $50,000 by October.

READ: Fight Hunger With These 5 Charities

“All summer long we are bringing it out to local events,” said Jacquie Berglund, CEO of Finnegans, Inc. “And we’ll be putting it on a schedule with a social media campaign so people can follow it.”

The Reverse Food Truck was a natural expansion project for the company, which operates as a sudsy sustainable business with social impact. Since its founding in 2000, 100% of the profits from Finnegans’ beer–an Irish amber and blonde ale, both sold in the Midwest–have been funneled to Finnegans Community Fund, a 501(c), to support regional hunger alleviation programs.

“The model is very similar to Newman’s Own,” said Berglund, whose prior career involved stints at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in France, as well as for a Minnesota group of pubs before she decided to become an entrepreneur.

BBETTERDAILY: Honda

Soichiro Honda’s unique vision got him ostracized by the Japanese business community. Honda was a mechanical genius who idolized Edison and rebelled against the norm. His passion for aggressive individualism was more fit for the United States, and thus alienated him from Japanese businessmen, who valued teamwork above all else. Honda then boldly challenged the American automotive industry in the 1970s and led a Japanese automotive revolution.